queendecuisine:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn

OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).
ANYWAY.
Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.
On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.
Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.
After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.
Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.
And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS IS THE MAN.

queendecuisine:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn


OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).

ANYWAY.

Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.

On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.

Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.

After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.

Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.

And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS IS THE MAN.

(via noticable-ninja)

bambi-sass:

bettydays:

I have a story.

So my sister got run over by a car once. It was a pretty big deal. Well like a year later she got into a little fender bender and was really bent out of shape about it, so I went and got her a cake. 

image

When I put in my order for the cake, the guy at the bakery asked, “Do you want it to say anything?”

And with a perfectly straight face, I said, “‘Sorry you got hit by a car again.’”

He narrowed his eyes a moment, then nodded and wrote it down, and took it to kitchen to get the writing done.

All the way from the back of the kitchen, I hear a woman shout, “‘Again’?!”

I work in a cake shop and I have to check all orders for delivery before they get sent out, my first shift involved me bringing out a huge 10 inch cake that weighed at least 13 pounds with the words ‘FUCKITY BYE!’ In capitals and attached was a gift message of ‘smell ya later Louise’

(Source: toocooltobehipster, via stone--cold--bush)

conniecann:

Last words of unarmed black youth gunned down by law enforcement. 

"There are reasons why white gun’s rights activists can walk into a Chipotle restaurant with assault rifles and be seen as gauche nuisances while unarmed black men are killed for reaching for their wallets or cell phones, or carrying children’s toys. Guns aren’t for black people, either.”

from America is Not For Black People

if you live your whole life and then die without making a purposeful choice to become a white ally then American racism becomes your legacy.

from Becoming a White Ally to Black People in the Aftermath of the Michael Brown Murder

(via peacelovecajun)

uppityfatty:

This is a life-size pre-cast clay sculpture of a naked fat woman. The model is Julie Srika. The sculptor is Ramon Sierra. I think it’s beautiful and important. Breathtaking, even. Two days ago I shared it on Facebook, with the permission of both the model and the artist. Many people responded to it as I did. Facebook then deleted the thread and removed the photo from the model’s account, citing it as being in violation of their “community standards.” Appeals to Facebook have yet to be answered.
I think this is a disturbing anti-art stance, particularly vexing, considering Facebook allows far more sexually suggestive photos and sanctions pages designed to promote bigotry and bullying. Yet an amazing piece of art depicting a fat woman in proud non-sexual repose must go.
So while this is not the traditional fare for Uppity Fatty, I’m posting it here so more people can see it without the small-minded interference of Facebook’s double-standards.
~ Substantia Jones

uppityfatty:

This is a life-size pre-cast clay sculpture of a naked fat woman. The model is Julie Srika. The sculptor is Ramon Sierra. I think it’s beautiful and important. Breathtaking, even. Two days ago I shared it on Facebook, with the permission of both the model and the artist. Many people responded to it as I did. Facebook then deleted the thread and removed the photo from the model’s account, citing it as being in violation of their “community standards.” Appeals to Facebook have yet to be answered.

I think this is a disturbing anti-art stance, particularly vexing, considering Facebook allows far more sexually suggestive photos and sanctions pages designed to promote bigotry and bullying. Yet an amazing piece of art depicting a fat woman in proud non-sexual repose must go.

So while this is not the traditional fare for Uppity Fatty, I’m posting it here so more people can see it without the small-minded interference of Facebook’s double-standards.

~ Substantia Jones

(via peacelovecajun)